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#446 - 12/14/2004 14:47 PM Which way to go?
Anonymous
Unregistered

Hi all.
I'm 24 and going to college for the first time sometime next year.
My two choices are a wonderful adult-oriented college at NYU or a community college.
I'm wondering whether I should first go to a JC and then transfer to the NYU college, or go straight to the latter?
I've been reading a lot of good things about community colleges, plus NYC is rumored to have great ones.
But as of now I don't really feel prepared for college...plus my social skills could use a lift, heh, ... so what is my best bet here?Thanks!

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#447 - 12/20/2004 08:26 AM Re: Which way to go?
WildEEP Offline
Member

Registered: 05/07/2004
Well the bottom line is that you should always do what feels right for you. If community college is more your speed, then feel free to start there and transfer over. Thats the great thing about college credits, one you earn them, they are yours for life.

One thing to note though is that while the credits you gain at any accredited college will remain with you, you may not be able to use them all toward your specific degree.

As an example "Intro to Computers" may be a 4 Credit class that you took in your community college as a start to their path for a minor in computer science....but this new college you want to transfer do doesnt see it that way and they'll only let you use it as an elective type credit, not credit that applies to the core coursework for the degree.

Doesnt sound like a big deal but in some cases for folks who caught unawares, they wound up with 2 years worth of all elective credit, and their degree only required 1 years worth..so that was basically an entire year worth of money, time, and effort wasted..in the scope of obtaining whatever degree you were after.

Hope that all made sense.

Your best bet is to talk with the college you want to transfer into ahead of time and figure out what they do and do not accept in the way of transfer credits into a specific major, just in the way of planning.

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#448 - 12/23/2004 22:29 PM Re: Which way to go?
tcnixon Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 11/21/2004
Loc: California, USA
There are a number of different factors that can weigh in on your choice:

1. Cost comparison between the two schools;
2. Transferability of credits;
3. Availability of classes;
4. Ease/difficulty of courses;
5. And so on.

It sounds like you have two good choices which is always nice. Since you haven't been to college, you may find that it is easier to start out at the community college and then transfer.

Try to remember what kind of student you were in high school. If you were a bit of a procrastinator (and weren't we all), you may wish to re-orient yourself to being a student. Again, the community college may be the better choice.

However, it does sound like the 4-year college has resources for returning students. Take full advantage of those resources. Ultimately, the decision comes down to whatever makes you comfortable.

Visit both schools and talk with students. Then talk with a professor at each (if that's possible). Let them help you make the right decision.


Tom Nixon
_________________________
http://BestOnlineHighSchools.com
Author, Complete Guide to Online High Schools
Co-author, Bears' Guide to Earning Degrees by Distance Learning

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